Kosovo 20 Years On: Implications for International Order

23. Edward Newman and Gëzim Visoka (2019), ‘Kosovo 20 Years On: Implications for International Order’, The Brown Journal of World Affairs. 26(1): 215-231. Kosovo is a small country that has had a major impact on the evolving international order—the norms and institutions that shape the behavior and practices of states and other international actors. In three controversial policy […]

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Everyday Peace Capture: Nationalism and the Dynamics of Peace after Violent Conflict

22. Gëzim Visoka (2020), ‘Everyday Peace Capture: Nationalism and the Dynamics of Peace after Violent Conflict’, Nations and Nationalism. (Accepted and forthcoming). Nationalism is arguably one of the most detrimental peace-breaking factors in conflict-affected societies. This article examines how ethno-nationalist elites, subterranean movements, and ordinary people can become blockages to sustainable peace and reconciliation after violent conflict. It […]

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Metis Diplomacy: The Everyday Politics of Becoming a Sovereign State

21. Gëzim Visoka (2019), ‘Metis Diplomacy: The Everyday Politics of Becoming a Sovereign State’, Cooperation and Conflict, 52(2): 167-190. How do emerging states obtain international recognition and secure membership of international organisations in contemporary world politics? This article explores the everyday politics of becoming a sovereign state in world politics. Using the concept of ‘metis’, this […]

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Critique and Alternativity in International Relations

20. Gëzim Visoka (2019), ‘Critique and Alternativity in International Relations’, International Studies Review,  https://doi.org/10.1093/isr/viy065. This article critically interrogates the episteme of alternativity in International Relations (IR) to rethink the purpose of critical knowledge in global politics. It questions what critical knowledge is for and whose purpose it serves. While alternativity is the very condition which has given […]

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The European Union’s Practice of State Recognition: Between Norms and Interests

19. Edward Newman and Gëzim Visoka (2018), ‘The European Union’s Practice of State Recognition: Between Norms and Interests’, Review of International Studies, 44(4): 760-786. This article explores the European Union’s (EU) practices of international state recognition in a transitional international order. It illustrates the difficulties that the EU has encountered in attempting to reach a collective […]

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The Foreign Policy of State Recognition: Kosovo’s Diplomatic Strategy to Join International Society

18. Edward Newman  and Gëzim Visoka (2018), ‘The Foreign Policy of State Recognition: Kosovo’s Diplomatic Strategy to Join International Society’, Foreign Policy Analysis, 14(3): 367-387.  This article explores the policies and activities undertaken by Kosovo as it seeks diplomatic recognition under conditions of contested statehood and transitional international order. Existing debates about diplomatic recognition – in particular, […]

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The Promise and Future of Neo-Functional Peace: A Reply to Bergmann and Niemann

17. Gëzim Visoka and John Doyle (2018), ‘The Promise and Future of Neo-Functional Peace: A Reply to Bergmann and Niemann’, Journal of Common Market Studies, 56(2): 439-455.  Julian Bergmann and Arne Niemann claim that ‘neo-functional peace’ was insufficiently conceptualised and empirically unsubstantiated. They draw on the original neo-functionalist literature to propose a logic of spill-over to […]

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Normal Peace: A New Strategic Narrative of Intervention

16. Nicolas Lemay-Hébert and Gëzim Visoka (2017), ‘Normal Peace: A New Strategic Narrative of Intervention’, Politics and Governance, 5(3): 146-156.  International actors have used multiple discursive frameworks for justifying interventions, from human security to the responsibility to protect, and, most recently, resilience-building. We argue that, the language of normalization, hidden behind these narratives of interventions, has […]

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After Liberal Peace? From Failed Statebuilding to an Emancipatory Peace in Kosovo

15. Gëzim Visoka and Oliver P. Richmond (2017), ‘After Liberal Peace? From Failed Statebuilding to an Emancipatory Peace in Kosovo’, International Studies Perspectives, 18(1): 110-129. Attempts to build a liberal peace and a concurrent neoliberal state in Kosovo have not managed to produce a sustainable and emancipatory peace. Instead, they have produced a local and negative […]

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Albanian Peacekeepers: Exploring the Inward-looking Utility of International Peacekeeping

14. Elvin Gjevori and Gëzim Visoka (2016), ‘Albanian Peacekeepers: Exploring the Inward-looking Utility of International Peacekeeping’, International Peacekeeping, 23(4): 513-539. This article provides the first comprehensive account of Albania’s contribution to international peacekeeping and explores its inward-looking rationales for providing peacekeepers. Specifically, we examine why Albania has energetically supported NATO- and EU-led military and crisis management […]

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